Sunday
Mar012015

Announcing auditions for: Red - by John Logan

Langhorne Players is pleased to announce its second production of the 2015 season Red to be performed at the Spring Garden Mill of Tyler State Park, 1440 Newtown-Richboro Road, Newtown, PA 18940 May 29 to June 13. The show is directed by Patrick Chmel and produced by Ken Junkins.

Audition Dates are Saturday March 14 at 12:00 with invited callbacks on Sunday, March 15 from 1pm to 3pm. Auditions will be held at Pennswood Village, 1382 Newtown Langhorne Road, Newtown, PA 18940 in the residents conference room. See below for directions.

Audition materials are provided HERE.

If possible, read the play prior to the audition. If you cannot, at least Google the play and become familiar with it. You do not have to memorize the monologues or the dialogue if you are called back, but know them well.

TWO CHARACTERS:

ROTHKO: 50 or thereabout. He is uncompromising, brilliant, and intimidating. He argues fiercely. He is arrogant to a fault. But he is totally human. He looks deeply into his own paintings with a sense of anxiety and wonder. Actors will miss the point of the character if they focus only on his bombast and miss his deep and genuine love for his art and his need to be understood.

KEN: In his 20’s. The young assistant who wants to learn from the great Rothco. He begins the play in awe of Rothko, tentative, nervous, but his growth is remarkable. He increasingly challenges Rothko and emerges as Rothko’s intellectual equal. He is the voice of a new generation of artists that threatens Rothko’s rule.

Playwright Logan said the play is essentially about father/son.

 

Auditioners will deliver the two monologues uninterrupted.

Auditions will be closed.


LOCATION:

PENNSWOOD VILLAGE, NEWTOWN, PA., NEXT TO THE GEORGE SCHOOL
1382 NEWTOWN LANGHORNE ROAD

SATURDAY’S AUDITION IN THE RESIDENT’S CONFERENCE ROOM, CALLBACKS ALSO IN PENNSWOOD VILLAGE, IN THE PENN HALL AUDITORIUM

DIRECTIONS:

FROM i-95 TAKE PA-332 (NEWTOWN BYPASS) WEST TOWARDS NEWTOWN. TURN LEFT AT THE NEWTOWN-LANGHORNE ROAD DRIVE PAST GEORGE SCHOOL ON YOUR RIGHT, TURN RIGHT INTO PENNSWOOD VILLAGE AND DRIVE TO THE STOP SIGN. TURN RIGHT TOWARD THE COMMUNITY CENTER AND PARKING AREAS. PARK IN PARKING LOT P1 (VISITORS AND GUESTS) AND WALK TO THE COMMUNITY CENTER. (DO NOT PARK IN THE CIRCLE BY THE COMMUNITYI CENTER ENTRANCE UNLESS YOU NEED HANDICAP PARKING) ON ENTERING THE FRONT DOOR, TURN LEFT AT THE RECEPTION DESK. THE CONFERENCE ROOM IS A SHORT WAY DOWN THE HALL. SOMEONE WILL BE THERE TO GREET YOU.

For further information or questions email Patrick at chmel@rider.edu or Ken at Junkins@aesop.rutgers.edu

Tuesday
Dec092014

Announcing our 2015 Season!

Vanya and Sonya and Masha and Spike by Christopher Durang

April 17, 18, 19, 23, 24, 25, 26, 29, 30, May 1, 2

The perfect melding of Bucks County charm and family dysfunction. Come join us for an evening that is by turns endearing, ridiculous, and surprising- but never dull. Crazy siblings, a cleaning woman who can predict the future, an aging starlet and her boy-toy, all honed to a fever comedic pitch that will no doubt have Anton Chekhov rolling over in his grave. We won't spoil the fun, but the costume party alone is worth the price of admission. Winner of the 2013 Tony Award for Best Play.

 

Red by John Logan

May 29, 30, 31, June 4, 5, 6, 7, 10, 11, 12, 13

An intense study of a brilliant mind that immmerses viewers in the "texture of thoughts". Red follows renowned expressionist Mark Rothko as he executesa series of murals that in 1958 represent the biggest modern art commission in history. The play follows the evolving tension between Rothko and his young assistant that culminates in what Dramatists describes as " the agonizing possibility that his crowning achievement could also become his undoing". A portrait of intense retrospection, ambition, and vulnerability, and an exhilarating explosion of activity and paint that you won't soon forget. "John Logan sends the American abstract painter Mark Rothko into battle with his demons... and the artist's howls are pure music." (Variety) Winner of six Tony Awards.

 

Good People by David Lindsay-Abaire

July 10, 11, 12, 16, 17, 18, 19, 22, 23, 24, 25

Margie, barely covering last month's bills with this month's paycheck, has lost yet another job. Facing eviction, she places her hopes on an old fling who's made it out of her South Boston neighborhood- but is the guy confident enough to face his humble beginnings? With unique style and appealing characters, Lindsay-Abaire explores the "struggles, shifting loyalties and unshakeable hopes that come with having next to nothing in America" and asks whether it's character or just being in the right place at the right time that determines our fates. Lindsay-Abaire is the Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright of Rabbit Hole and his Good People received two nominations including Best Play in 2011.

 

Speed-The-Plow by David Mamet

August 14, 15, 16, 20, 21, 22, 23, 26, 27, 28, 29

The original production starred Joe Mantegna, Ron Silver, and Madonna in dissecting- well, maybe vivisecting- corrupt Hollywood culture. Two producer/friends are reaching for the big time, pitching a new script with a big star already on board, to a major studio. Their efforts get sidetracked when they wager over the seduction of a temporary secretary. She seduces one of them to advance her own interest in another project- an "apocalyptically spiritual novel" with no screen potential. The New York Times called Speed-The-Plow "hilarious and chilling" and the New York Post chimed in with "wonderful, dazzling, brilliant".

 

Breaking The Code by Hugh Whitemore

October 2, 3, 4, 8, 9, 10, 14, 15, 16, 17

Breaking The Code is based on the true story of famed mathematician and computer science pioneer Alan Turing, who cracked the Enigma Code during World War II, not aware he'd be facing a more personal battle back home. An elegant and moving tour de force, Hugh Whitemore's play is about a brilliant and expansive spirit who died too soon, either overlooked or vilified. Turing was unable to receive public recognition for his work because it was too far ahead of its time and conducted under a veil of wartime secrecy. Yet he was vilified by that same public when he was caught up in a homosexual scandal in the midst of Cold War paranoia that considered anyone different to be the enemy.


Wednesday
Jul162014

Take A Peak Behind The Scenes At Langhorne Players

This week The Midweek Wire published an article about our presentation at the Anna Mary Williamson Library and Museum in Langhorne where we talked about the process of putting up a show:

http://midweekwire.com/2014/07/16/behind-the-curtain-2/